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Toyota Tacoma 05-08 2.7 LTR Replacement Engine

Toyota Tacoma 05-08 2.7 ltr replacement engine

Engine World Blogs
 
 

WHAT IS TUNE-UP ? The word "Tune Up" is probably the most misused and misunderstood Automotive term.  According to the Merriam-Webster's dictionary under the term "Tune-up" it says:  "general adjustment to insure operation at peak efficiency"

A tuneup by this definition could be whatever it takes to bring the vehicle to peak efficiency; whether it is a few adjustments or maybe a whole new engine. 

ENGINE TUNE UP GUIDE
 
PLEASE INFORM YOUR MECHANIC OR AUTO REPAIR SHOP TO FOLLOW THE BELOW MENTIONED TUNE-UP PREOCEDURE BEFORE INSTALLATION  TO COMPLY WITH OUR WARRANTY TERMS & CONDITIONS.
 
ALWAYS - Use the long block engine only. Never use anything that came with the engine except the head and block. For smog related reasons, this engine  may have different emission devices and you are required to transfer all external components from your old engine to comply with the smog laws of your state.
 
ALWAYS - Since our warranty does not cover Over-Heating of an engine. We strongly recommend doing a ROD-OUT service on your radiator and if radiator is not good, we recommend changing it with a new one. Please don't just simply flush as it is not enough.
 
ALWAYS - Replace following Tune up parts with NEW ones.

  • SPARK PLUGS
  • THERMOSTAT
  • WATERPUMP
  • TIMING BELT
  • BAL. SHAFT BELT
  • T/B TENSIONERS / IDLERS 
  • FRONT & REAR MAIN SEALS
  • CAMSHAFT SEALS
  • TEMP SENDING UNIT
  • SPARK PLUG WIRES
  • OIL
  • OIL / AIR FILTER
  • INTAKE MANIFOLD GASKETS
  • EXHAUST MANIFOLD GASKETS
  • T/B HYDRUALIC TENSIONER
  • OIL PAN GASKET
  • PCV VALVE
  • OIL SENDING UNIT
  • DISTRIBUTOR CAP & ROTOR
  • OIL PUMP If our engine has no Crank Sensor.
  • Replace Oil Pump from your old engine if our engine does not have crank sensor .

ALWAYS - Prime the engine with motor oil first before starting this will reduce initial wear start up on the motor.
Note: Your mechanic MUST follow this tune up / installation guide procedure.
 
 
 ABOUT TUNE-UP IN GENERAL

Before electronics came into the picture the term "tune-up" was applied to the maintenance operation of replacing the spark plugs, distributor points, inspecting or replacing the cap and rotor and possibly replacing the fuel and air filters. There were many adjustments to be done on these cars; point gap, ignition timing and idle mixture and dwell. 
This was a preventative maintenance operation that usually needed to be done about every 12,000 miles. 

Most cars made now do not have a distributor. Even spark plug wires are missing from many applications. Forget those adjustments, the onboard computer handles fuel mixture, timing and idle speed control.  On many of the newer cars, just spark plugs, fuel and air filters and PCV valve remain of the items that we used to consider part of a "tune up". Someday the spark plugs might disappear also.

Because the word "tune up" can mean so many different things the manufactures don’t list tune ups in their maintenance schedules. They list the items individually at specific miles or duration of time.

If you request a tune-up, always ask what is being done for your "tune-up" before comparing prices and don't expect a "tune-up" to cure your performance problems. A "tune-up" is a maintenance procedure and if it makes your car run better, you waited too long for the service.  Performance problems on today's cars are usually caused by something that is not normally replaced during a maintenance tune-up.

Best Option


Don't ask for a tuneup, check your owner's manual for a guideline on spark plug replacement intervals. If they're due, replace them and use original equipment spark plugs for best performance. If you do much city driving, extended idling, towing or high speed driving, reduce that recommended mileage by at least 10 - 15%.
Fuel filters, distributor caps and rotors and PCV valves should be replaced every 30,000 to 50,000 miles. Spark plug wires should be replaced every 60,000 miles.

Many new cars do not have distributor caps or spark plug wires. On some vehicles, fuel filters are part of the fuel pump and are only changed when they plug up and ruin the fuel pump.

If your car is misfiring and you don't know if the spark plugs were replaced at the last recommended interval it might be a good idea to have it done. Use the above guide for the other components.

A 30, 60 or 90 thousand mile service is not a "tune-up", it may include tune up items but will also include many other services.
If you are wanting the scheduled services, ask for a price and breakdown on the scheduled service. (such as a 60,000 mile service) Asking for a 60,000 mile tune-up may not get you what is needed.

HOW TO TUNE-UP A JAPANESE CAR ? ( ACURA, HONDA, TOYOTA, NISSAN, MAZDA, MITSUBISHI, SUBARU, SUZUKI, ISUZU, LEXUS)

  • Step 1
    Replace the fuel filter. If you have a fuel-injection system, regular cleaning isn't necessary unless the injectors are clogged.

 

  • Step 2

    Change the spark plugs (unless they're platinum, in which case you have 30,000 more miles to go). Also examine the spark plug wires and replace as needed. A new set of high-quality wires is worth the cost. They may be permanently attached to the distributor cap, so it will have to be changed as well.

  • Step 3

    Replace the distributor cap and rotor if your car has them (some newer models with distributorless ignition don't).

  • Step 4

    Change the points and condenser if you have an older car (roughly 1978 or older) that doesn't feature electronic ignition. You'll actually want your points changed, or at least adjusted, every six months or so (if they're changed, check the ignition timing as well).

  • Step 5

    Check the ignition timing and adjust as needed (rare for a car with electronic ignition--post-1980--and some cars don't allow this at all).

  • Step 6

    Adjust the valves as needed (unless your car has hydraulic valves). Be sure to replace the valve-cover gasket as well, especially if you see oil on top of your engine.

  • Step 7

    Check the belts. Replace if worn.

  • Step 8

    Check the fluids under the hood and replenish as necessary. Change the oil and oil filter if it's been 3,000 miles since the last oil change.

  • Step 9

    Replace the air filter, which should be changed between major services--every 15,000 miles--as well.

  • Step 10

    Adjust the clutch, if you have a manual transmission (although some cars now sport self-adjusting clutches).

  • Step 11

    Service the battery, adding distilled water (if required), cleaning terminals and cable ends.

  • Step 12

    Replace the PCV (positive crankcase ventilation) valve. It can make your car run rough or stall if it gets clogged, and it's cheap and easy to replace

  • Step 13: Cooling System : Visually check the Radiator and radiator hoses, drain the old antifreeze / coolant. Refill the radiator with appropriate type and amount of antifreeze / coolant. Visually inspect for antifreeze / coolant leaks and damage at radiator cap to filler neck or reservoir seals. Visually inspect radiator / pressure cap for cracks, seal or thread damage or tab retention damage. Pressure test radiator/ Presure cap to ensure it holds proper pressure as designed. Replace radiator / pressure cap with a new cap that meets OEM specifications. YOU MUST DO ROD OUT SERVICE ON THE RADIATOR, ONLY FLUSHING IT IS NOT ENOUGH.

  •  TRANSMISSION: Fill new transmission fluid, same as recommended by the manufacturer. Follow the instructions mentioned in the owner's manual while replacing with new fluid. Replace all seals.